sustainable ranching California ranchers herd cattle in lush pastures. Photo © Felix Rigau

Who Raised Your Filet?

How Ranchers and Conservationists Came Together on Grass-fed Beef

Meet Our Partner Darrell Wood

The Nature Conservancy knows that conservation must be economically and environmentally viable in order to be lasting. That’s why we work side-by-side with ranchers like Darrell Wood, a sixth-generation California cattle rancher, to create the tools and techniques they need to produce high-quality food in environmentally smart ways.

“Protecting these grazing landscapes is just so important,” says Wood, president and one of the founding ranchers of Panorama Meats. “It helps provide good, healthy grass-fed beef, a means to protect threatened and endangered species, and clean water and clean air. It all fits together.”

Unlikely Partners

And while ranchers and conservationists may seem like unlikely collaborators, the Conservancy leases its Vina Plains Preserve to Wood, partnering with him and his family to develop new grazing techniques that provide cattle with room to roam and eat while protecting California’s grasslands.

“As ranchers, we have an obligation to preserve the rangelands for future generations,” says Wood. “I want my family to be able to stay in the grass-fed cattle business. It’s a viable business—but it’s only viable if the rangelands are preserved.”

Grazing for Good

In recent years, the Conservancy has studied the environmental impacts of our grazing techniques at Vina Plains Preserve. We’ve learned that our approach keeps ecosystems healthy by supporting vernal pools (seasonal wetlands), removing invasive weeds and reducing fire hazards.

Food You Can Feel Good About

For us consumers, it means we can do what we love—eat delicious, healthy food produced in ways we can feel good about.

Hungry? Check out Darrell's chipotle-braised Panorama grass-fed beef short ribs.

 

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